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Title: BCA Cricket Development Plan (EXTRACT)

Author: bcacricket.org

Date Submitted: 2019-06-03

Keywords: Cricket Development Plan

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May 21, 2019

The Barbados Cricket Association is inviting stakeholders to comment on its Cricket Development Plan (2019-2024) by submitting comments on the following extract, to theoffice@bca.org.bb







Barbados Cricket Association

Cricket Development Plan

2019 - 2024 3. THE PLAN

3.1. Vision

Any cricket development plan for the BCA must be formulated with the BCA’s Mission and Vision statements firmly in view:

Mission Statement

“To create a sustainable environment for the holistic development of Barbados’ cricket for the benefit and enjoyment of stakeholders”

Vision Statement

“To become the premier cricket organization providing world class products and services for stakeholders”

Implementation of the interventions which are shown below will contribute greatly to the BCA’s vision of providing world class products and services for stakeholders, i.e. developing world class cricketers with the ability to make Barbados proud wherever they go by performing at a world class level.

3.2. Future Management of Kensington Oval

The BCA must negotiate the return of all management functions of Kensington Oval to the BCA to allow it to fully implement its development plan while assuring Government that every effort would be made to accommodate the staging of major cultural events at the Oval to which the general public has become accustomed. The BCA must not fear assuming financial responsibility for maintenance of the Oval as there is significant revenue to be earned from the long term rental of suites and advertising boards and most, importantly, the staging of quality tournaments, details for which will be given in the following sections.

3.3. Indoor Training Facilities

The EWCOE has performed admirably in the preparation of players of all age groups and gender, to-date. However, training at the facility is limited to daylight hours and greatly influenced by weather conditions. In order to get around this problem, the BCA needs to commission an indoor training facility. Fortunately, the Kensington Oval complex includes a building – the old “Armstrong” facility – which is large enough to accommodate the indoor nets, pitches, etc. This building is currently used for storage.

Once management of the Oval is fully restored to the BCA, the Association must make construction of the indoor training facility a priority. This would allow training sessions to be conducted after dark and also when the area is under the influence of bad weather.

3.4. Coaches in Primary Schools

The BCA must:

• Negotiate with relevant authorities for the provision of at least one teacher (with cricket knowledge and interest) to help manage and support the cricket programme in each school;

• Organize a Level I coaching education programme for primary school teachers;

• Add four new schools to the number of primary schools participating in the Kiddies Cricket programme on an annual basis;

• Institute a schedule for the BCA’s in-house coaches to visit primary schools to provide support for execution of the planned cricket programme in such schools;

• Deploy a suitable BCA full time officer to be dedicated to the administration of Youth/Schools cricket supported by the CWI/BCA Cricket Development Officer in order to ensure smooth implementation and operation of the initiatives for Schools’ Cricket and monitor and report monthly on its progress.

3.5 Improving the Infrastructure for Secondary Schools/Youth Cricket

The BCA will provide a cricket coach for each of its member schools. This coach will be responsible for creating and managing a BCA approved standardized cricket programme, supported with relevant equipment. The programme will include a series of master classes, coaching, sessions/workshops for training potential match officials and technical support personnel, providing knowledge of the historical role and benefits of cricket to the nation and the modern trends in cricket locally, regionally and internationally.

3.5.1. Organization and Management

The school will be required to establish an intensive cricket programme to include:

• Having at least one team participating in BCA cricket;

• Scheduled cricket coaching and playing sessions for boys and girls;

• Participation of match officials in cricket education training workshops;

• Establishment of a mechanism for reporting details of scores and results in respect of BCA matches played at the school;

• Setting up a 'mock' cricket club in each school where there is a Board led by a President and supported by a Secretary and at least seven other members, two of whom shall be the coach and one of the assisting personnel of the school. The club shall have members recruited from the school’s population such as its cricket community and other interested pupils, who shall pay a very small membership fee. The purpose of the club is to help organize and manage the affairs of cricket, and thereby provide an environment to encourage discipline in the administration of cricket and to prepare pupils for entry into cricket clubs when they leave school.

 

3.5.2. Coaching

The BCA will provide a dedicated cricket coach to each member school of the BCA to coordinate the cricket programme with the appropriate personnel of the school. The coach will be paid by the BCA and the assisting personnel of the school will be given a stipend. Where a school already has a coach, an appropriate support package will be put in place for that school.

3.5.3. Support for Equipment

The BCA will assist schools with the acquisition of covers for pitches and other cricket equipment.

3.5.4. Barbados Youth Elite and First Division Teams

In order to alleviate the stress placed on schools when their players are selected to the Barbados Youth teams the BCA needs to add the following clause to its rules: "That schools shall make at least three players available for selection to play in the Elite or First Division Barbados Youth team, as the case may be, in any one match once selected. In turn a school may, in addition to the three staff members currently allowed by the regulations to play in any one match for the school, may select any player (not being a staff member or current student of the school) in any one match in the competition or competitions of the BCA in which the school participates."

3.5.5. Preparation and Selection of National Youth Teams

A framework for the preparation of each youth cohort aimed at selection for participation in regional youth tournaments will be established as follows:

• Selection from players chosen from the EWCOE with additions by the Youth Selection Panel;

• Scheduling of training/practice and trial matches;

• Selection of the national squad;

• Selection of the ‘A’ team squad;

• Preparation and practice matches for the national squad leading up to CWI tournament;

• Training and practice matches for the ‘A’ Team squad to be scheduled.

3.5.6. Schools/Youth Cricket Coordinator

A suitable BCA full time officer will be dedicated to the administration of Youth/Schools cricket, supported by the CWI/BCA Cricket Development Officer to ensure a smooth implementation and operation of the initiatives for Schools Cricket. The officer will monitor and report monthly on the programme.

3.6. Support for Clubs

The significant increase over the years in the amount of cricket playing days on which clubs are expected to field teams, the ever increasing cost of living in Barbados, the inability of many young players to pay clubs’ subscriptions and the failure of many clubs to collect enough revenue, have taken their toll on clubs and many can only be classified as “very poor”. Consequently, clubs are struggling to make ends meet and are unable to adequately maintain their facilities despite the assistance currently being provided by the BCA in the form of supply of cricket balls and the payment of umpires’ fees.

The BCA will continue its assistance to clubs with respect to the balls and umpires’ fees and, in addition, provide grants to clubs proportionately according to the number of divisions in which they participate. Clubs will also receive grants for development of youth programmes for boys and girls. In addition, the BCA will give cash incentives to players in the Elite Division for outstanding performances during the domestic season, for example, batsmen who score centuries, bowlers who take five wickets in an innings etc., in order to make players strive for excellence.

3.6.1. Administration

Clubs will be required to lodge with the BCA the Club’s Rules/Constitution outlining the structure of governance for administration of its affairs and also submit to the BCA within thirty days of commencement of the domestic cricket season the following:

• An up to date list of members - playing and non-playing - for the ensuing year;

• Payment of its registration fees for participation in its desired competition(s) for the upcoming domestic season;

• Proof of holding of Annual General Meeting (AGM) for the year leading to the upcoming domestic cricket season, including the Annual Report containing the financial statements approved at the AGM;

3.6.2. Grants and Incentive Scheme

The BCA will continue to supply balls for all competitions to all clubs, pay all umpires’ fees and also provide an annual Grant to each club as follows:

• Clubs playing in three divisions - $15,000.00

• Clubs playing in two divisions - $10,000.00

• Clubs paying in one division - $5,000.00

These grants will be reviewed by the Board on an annual basis. To be eligible for a grant, a club shall be required to:

• Establish and organize an institutionalized youth cricket programme for boys and girls;

• Participate in the BCA’s insurance coverage programme by paying the per head fee required by the insurer;

• Be fully represented at the General and Special meetings of the Association during the year of the grant.

The BCA may provide supplements to a Grant where a club establishes proof of:

• Non forfeiture of matches during the domestic season;

• Payment of annual subscriptions by each member (playing and non-playing);

• Establishment of a women’s cricket team;

• Expansion of the existing subscriptions and bar takings business;

• New membership;

• Attracting sponsorship.

Any infringement of the rules or regulations governing the BCA and its competitions may affect the payment of any supplement under consideration by the Board. The payment of any supplement shall be subject to the discretion of the Board solely.

3.6.3. Grants and Incentive Scheme

Players in the Elite and First Divisions will be rewarded with incentive payments based on their performances on a match by match basis.

3.6.4. Pitches, Facilities and Equipment

Wherever possible clubs should aim for the following standards;

1. A pavilion that seats a minimum of 50 persons with a clear view of the playing field;

2. A food and beverage area including a bar and dining area to serve a minimum of 20 persons seated;

3. Pitch covers to adequately protect the square and bowlers’ run ups;

4. A push/drive mower and an edger;

5. A minimum of one heavy and one light mower;

6. Two sight screens that can be easily switched from white to black;

7. A communications area that incorporates a computer and public address system;

8. Adequate team dressing rooms and bathroom facilities for both male and females;

9. A trophy cabinet and notice boards;

10. At least two full time staff members for administrative duties and field preparation/maintenance.

3.6.5. Clubs Cricket Coordinator

The Director of Cricket, supported by the CWI/BCA Cricket Development Officer will coordinate Clubs’ cricket.

3.7. Improvement for Development of Women’s Cricket

A number of Barbadians have been selected to play for the West Indies’ Women’s cricket team and they have performed creditably on the world stage, having recently won the World T20 championship. Barbados must build on this and put the systems in place to ensure that Barbados’ female cricketers continue to merit selection for the West Indies and that when they reach the world stage they will be able to perform consistently at world class level.

3.7.1. Iris Walker Competition

An incentive scheme for performance in the Iris Walker Memorial competition, similar to that proposed for the men’s achievements in domestic competitions will be put in place for the female cricketers. Elite cricketers must also be required to play in this competition to be eligible for selection to the Barbados Womens’ team.

3.7.2. Incentive Scheme Including Contracts for talented Players

Up to a maximum of fifteen female cricketers, not in possession of CWI contracts, will be given contracts by the BCA. Programmes will be put in place for these players to ensure their development into world class performers.

3.7.3. High Performance Programme

High performance cricket activities for women will be conducted at the Rubis facility as part of EWCOE programme and will include the following:

• Weekly practice and training sessions for junior and senior female cricketers;

• Weekly practice sessions for elite female cricketers;

• Batting, bowling, fielding, and wicket keeping master classes;

• Workshops/seminars exposing participants to a curriculum on general cricket education, the history of Barbados cricket, and personal development training;

• Annual women’s cricket fun and family day.

3.7.4. Preparation of National Teams

National teams will be selected based on assessment by the coaches at the EWCOE as well as the performances in the Iris Walker Memorial competition.

3.7.5. Cricket Programmes in Schools

The following programme for girls at schools will be implemented:

• The primary school coaches will be utilized in the recruitment of girls to play cricket in the primary schools;

• An agreement with the National Sports Council and primary schools for selection of at least one girl to play in the final eleven of each team participating in the Herman Griffith competition will be pursued;

• A secondary schools’ cricket programme for girls from First to Third Forms including exposure to fundamentals of cricket and an in-school modified cricket competition for enjoyment, designed to increase girls’ interest in cricket, will be introduced. The modified competition could be a seven-a-side contest, using tennis balls, graduating to a tennis ball covered with leather, and a playing pitch of 18 yards in length. Players would be allowed to deliver the ball by any means possible except underarm and all games could be limited to ten overs per side. The objective of this initiative is to expose at least 150 junior girls to cricket;

• A similar competition for girls in Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Forms pursuant to the introduction of an inter schools competition at an appropriate time will be introduced. The program will include young ladies from the Barbados Community College and the Samuel Jackman Prescod Polytechnic. The objective of this initiative is to expose at least 200 senior girls to cricket.

3.7.6. Women’s Cricket Coordinator

A suitable BCA full time officer will be dedicated to the administration of the women’s schools cricket programme, supported by the CWI/BCA Cricket Development Officer to ensure a smooth implementation and operation of the initiatives put in place for girls at schools. The officer will monitor and report monthly on the programme.

3.8. Improvements for Pitch Preparation and Covering

• An annual training and development seminar for curators including exposure to preparation of pitches for international matches at Kensington Oval will be introduced;

• Kensington oval ground staff will be provided with appropriate uniforms, branded “Ground Staff”;

• Appropriate rules to govern on the job conduct of Kensington Oval ground staff will be introduced.

3.9. Improvements to Everton Weekes Centre of Excellence

Any fan of West Indies cricket who has watched the team compete over the past several years would have noticed the following transgressions:

• A high number of no-balls delivered by our bowlers;

• Inability of the bowlers to bowl a consistent line and length;

• Too many leg-side wides delivered in ODI’s and T20I’s;

• Too many dot balls delivered by opposing bowlers and, by extension, the failure of batsmen to improvise and score runs when the bowling is “tight”;

• Inability of the batsmen to effectively play spin bowling;

• Inability of batsmen to score freely on slow wickets;

• Inability of our batsmen to consistently and safely hook fast bowlers. In fact it appears that our batsmen are now scared of fast bowling;

• The apparent inability of our players to counter “intelligence” acquired by the opposition about them:

• The appearance that our players have not acquired any “intelligence” on the opposition.

The BCA’s coaches must concentrate on rectifying these problems which have been identified and, with respect to “intelligence”, there must be effective use of technology in order to address this very serious problem.

3.10. Cricket Scholarships and Placements

For the eighth consecutive year, the BCA managed to secure placements for two young cricketers through the Lancashire Cricket Board and the Wavertree and Sefton Park Cricket Clubs. However, this year the young cricketers experienced great difficulties with immigration authorities in the United Kingdom. It is anticipated that this problem will persist unless there is a concerted effort by the governments and sporting organizations in the region to make representation to the British immigration authorities to prevent these opportunities for our young cricketers from coming to an end.

3.11. Development of Senior Level Players

Senior players must be prepared to train extensively and to maintain a fitness level which would ensure that they are able to compete mentally and physically with the best teams in the world over a five day period. Their training must include studying of their opponents so that they will be able to develop the skills and tactics necessary to succeed against them. Players must also attend training workshops aimed at sharpening their communication skills and educating them on the other facets of life such as the negative influence of drugs and the positive aspects of good nutrition.

3.12. Domestic T20 Semi-professional League

In recent years T20 cricket has emerged as the most popular form of the game with the IPL, Big Bash, Ram Slam, CPL etc. attracting large viewing audiences in the various stadia all around the world. In addition to the T20 leagues, the ICC organizes T20 matches between international teams. Barbados has not produced many players for this version of the game for the West Indies or the T20 leagues. This is reflective of Barbados’ substandard domestic T20 competition. There is need for a more serious competition.

The BCA will institute a semi-professional T20 league competition with six teams. Six captains will be selected, sponsorship for the six teams will be sought and a draft will be conducted in a manner similar to the other T20 leagues around the world. Each team will include at least three players from the Barbados Cricket League (BCL) and two Under 21 players (for developmental purposes). The matches, played at night during the week, will attract large paying audiences ($10 entrance fee) if the cricket is exciting. This competition will replace the current Sagicor General T20 and should prove very attractive to these loyal sponsors of cricket in Barbados.

3.13. Domestic Super 50 Semi-professional League

In a manner similar to the T20 League, the BCA will introduce a semi-professional Day/Night Super 50 league competition with six teams selected along the same lines as for the T20, with representation from the BCL and the Under 21’s.

3.14. Domestic 3-Day Semi-professional League

The introduction of a 3-Day semi-professional league with four teams chosen, with no restrictions, to be played during the week (three matches per week using two additional venues) from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm will serve to prepare players for higher duty, i.e. the Barbados national team.

3.15. First Class Status

The BCA will ascertain if its domestic three day competition can qualify for First Class status and, if not, determine what it would take to achieve such status.

3.16. Search for Talent

The champion West Indies of the 1980’s to early 1990’s had inter alia the following types of players:

• Bowlers who bowled accurately and at express pace;

• Bowlers who were able to adapt to adverse conditions in order to remain effective;

• Batsmen who were fearless, batted with “good” technique and who were not afraid to take on the opposition.

The Champion Australian team of the period following the dominance of the West Indies possessed, in addition to batsmen and bowlers with similar abilities as outlined above, an exceptional and accurate world class leg spinner in the person of Shane Warne.

For the purposes of this plan the BCA will concentrate on finding express fast bowlers and fearless batsmen capable of taking on the opposition. The BCA will conduct an island-wide search for express fast bowlers, in the first instance, following which, under the eyes of the BCA coaching staff, they can be transformed into excellent fast bowlers. Similarly, a search will be conducted for aggressive batsmen (especially for the T20 version of the game) whose techniques can then be fine-tuned by the BCA’s coaches. The aim is to identify at least ten fast bowlers and ten aggressive batsmen over the next five years.

It must however be noted that if, in this search, players with exceptional talents in other areas of cricket are identified, these players will also be brought into the EWCOE for further development.

3.18. Cooperation with the Cricket Legends of Barbados (CLOBI)

Barbados has produced a number of legends and icons of cricket who are still alive and residing in the island. The BCA should formalize an arrangement with CLOBI which would enable a transfer of knowledge from these distinguished former players to the current players.



4. IMPLEMENTATION TIMELINES

It may appear from the Plan outlined above that successful implementation of this Cricket Development Plan is dependent on the return of Kensington Oval to the BCA. Although this is desirable, in the event that Government does not accede to the BCA’s request, the plan is still achievable, provided the BCA is allowed to convert the old “Armstrong Building” into an indoor training facility. In addition, without full control of the management of the Oval, staging the semi-professional league tournaments would be difficult, if not impossible, given that KOMI would still be the managers of Kensington Oval.

4.1. Year 1 (2019 - 2020)

The BCA’s goals for Year 1 are to:

1) Regain control of Kensington Oval;

2) Make strides in the quest to introduce coaches in schools;

3) Strengthen the women’s game;

4) Provide grants to clubs

5) Make incentive payments to players

6) Establish a formal relationship with CLOBI.

The full Year 1 programme is as follows:

• Commence and conclude negotiations to regain control of the management of Kensington Oval;

• Commence negotiations with relevant authorities for the provision of at least one teacher with cricket knowledge and interest to help manage and support a cricket programme in each primary school;

• Organize a Level 1 coaching education programme for primary school teachers;

• Add four new schools to the number of primary schools participating in the Kiddies Cricket programme;

• Deploy BCA in-house coaches to primary schools to provide support for the execution of the planned cricket programme in these schools;

• Select a BCA full time officer to be dedicated to the administration of Youth/Schools cricket;

• Negotiate for deployment of cricket masters/coaches to secondary schools;

• Assist secondary schools with procurement of equipment and covers for pitches;

• Organize cricket education workshops for primary and secondary schools’ coaches;

• Continue supply of cricket balls to clubs;

• Continue payment of fees for umpires officiating in the BCA’s domestic competitions;

• Commence payment of grants to clubs;

• Provide cash incentives for outstanding performances in the Elite Division;

• Primary school coaches to assist in the recruitment of girls to play cricket in the primary schools;

• Commence talks with the National Sports Council and primary schools to ensure selection of at least one girl to play in the final eleven of each team participating in the Herman Griffith competition;

• Intensify training for female cricketers at the EWCOE;

• Introduce an incentive payment system for outstanding performances in the Iris Walker competitions;

• Award contracts to five female cricketers;

• Commence search for fast bowlers and aggressive batsmen;

• Coaches to work assiduously with players at all levels in the EWCOE in an effort to correct problems associated with no-balls, wides, poor shot selection, etc.;

• Studying of opponents by use of available technology made compulsory for all senior male and female players;

• Organize workshops for match officials – scorers, match referees, curators and grounds-men;

• Establish a co-operation agreement with CLOBI.

4.2. Year 2 (2020- 2021)

In Year 2, it is assumed that the BCA has regained control of the Oval and can commence conversion of the “Armstrong Building” into an indoor training centre. This would allow the BCA to be able to enhance its training programme at the EWCOE for the various age groups. The BCA’s management of Kensington Oval would allow for the introduction of the semi-professional T20 league.

The Year 2 programme is as follows:

• Commission indoor training facility;

• Continue negotiations if necessary with relevant authorities for the provision of at least one teacher with cricket knowledge and interest to help manage and support a cricket programme in each primary school;

• Continue a Level 1 coaching education programme for primary school teachers;

• Add four new schools to the number of primary schools participating in the Kiddies Cricket programme;

• BCA in-house coaches to continue visits to primary schools to provide support for execution of the planned cricket programme in these schools;

• Continue negotiations if necessary for deployment of cricket masters/coaches to secondary schools;

• Assist secondary schools with procurement of equipment and covers for pitches;

• Organize cricket education workshops for primary and secondary schools coaches;

• Continue supply of cricket balls to clubs;

• Continue payment of fees for umpires officiating in the BCA’s domestic competitions;

• Continue payment of grants to clubs;

• Provide cash incentives for outstanding performances in Elite Division;

• Primary school coaches to continue assisting in the recruitment of girls to play cricket in the primary schools;

• Primary schools to ensure selection of at least one girl to play in the final eleven of each team participating in the Herman Griffith competition;

• Introduce a secondary schools cricket programme for girls from First to Third Forms;

• Intense training for female cricketers at the EWCOE to continue;

• Continue incentive payments for outstanding performances in the Iris Walker competitions;

• Award contracts to five female cricketers;

• Continue search for fast bowlers and aggressive batsmen;

• Coaches to continue working assiduously with players at all levels in the EWCOE in an effort to correct problems associated with no-balls, wides, poor shot selection, etc.;

• Studying of opponents by use of available technology made compulsory for all senior male and female players;

• CLOBI to be utilized as necessary in the training of players in the EWCOE, particularly with technique and “intelligence”;

• Organize workshops for match officials – scorers, match referees, curators and grounds-men;

• Commence domestic T20 semi-professional league.

4.3. Year 3 (2021 - 2022)

In Year 3, the BCA will be able to roll out the semi-professional Super 50 league, while maintaining a solid programme with respect to the EWCOE, the primary and secondary schools as well as women’s cricket.

The full Year 3 schedule is shown below:

• Continue negotiations if necessary with relevant authorities for the provision of at least one teacher with cricket knowledge and interest to help manage and support a cricket programme in each primary school;

• Continue a Level 1 coaching education programme for primary school teachers;

• Add four new schools to the number of primary schools participating in the Kiddies Cricket programme;

• BCA in-house coaches to continue visits to primary schools to provide support for execution of the planned cricket programme in these schools;

• Continue negotiations if necessary for deployment of cricket masters/coaches to secondary schools;

• Assist secondary schools with procurement of equipment and covers for pitches;

• Organize cricket education workshops for primary and secondary schools coaches;

• Continue supply of cricket balls to clubs;

• Continue payment of fees for umpires officiating in the BCA’s domestic competitions;

• Continue payment of grants to clubs;

• Provide cash incentives for outstanding performances in Elite Division;

• Primary school coaches to continue assisting in the recruitment of girls to play cricket in the primary schools;

• Primary schools to ensure selection of at least one girl to play in the final eleven of each team participating in the Herman Griffith competition;

• Continue the secondary schools cricket programme for girls from First to Third Forms;

• Introduce a secondary schools cricket programme for girls from Fourth to Sixth Forms;

• Intense training for female cricketers at the EWCOE to continue;

• Continue incentive payments for outstanding performances in the Iris Walker competitions;

• Award contracts to five female cricketers;

• Continue search for fast bowlers and aggressive batsmen;

• Coaches to continue working assiduously with players at all levels in the EWCOE in an effort to correct problems associated with no-balls, wides, poor shot selection, etc.;

• Studying of opponents by use of available technology made compulsory for all senior male and female players;

• CLOBI to be utilized as necessary in the training of players in the EWCOE, particularly with technique and “intelligence”;

• Organize workshops for match officials – scorers, match referees, curators and grounds-men;

• Continue domestic T20 semi-professional league;

• Commence domestic Super 50 semi-professional league.

4.4. Year 4 (2022 – 2023)

In Year 4, the BCA is able to commence its semi-professional 3-Day league while maintaining its programmes which were started earlier as shown below:

• Continue negotiations if necessary with relevant authorities for the provision of at least one teacher with cricket knowledge and interest to help manage and support a cricket programme in each primary school;

• Continue a Level 1 coaching education programme for primary school teachers;

• Add four new schools to the number of primary schools participating in the Kiddies Cricket programme;

• BCA in-house coaches to continue visits to primary schools to provide support for execution of the planned cricket programme in these schools;

• Continue negotiations if necessary for deployment of cricket masters/coaches to secondary schools;

• Assist secondary schools with procurement of equipment and covers for pitches;

• Organize cricket education workshops for primary and secondary schools coaches;

• Continue supply of cricket balls to clubs;

• Continue payment of fees for umpires officiating in the BCA’s domestic competitions;

• Continue payment of grants to clubs;

• Provide cash incentives for outstanding performances in Elite Division;

• Primary school coaches to continue assisting in the recruitment of girls to play cricket in the primary schools;

• Primary schools to ensure selection of at least one girl to play in the final eleven of each team participating in the Herman Griffith competition;

• Continue the secondary schools cricket programme for girls from First to Third Forms;

• Continue the secondary schools cricket programme for girls from Fourth to Sixth Forms;

• Intense training for female cricketers at the EWCOE to continue;

• Continue incentive payments for outstanding performances in the Iris Walker competition;

• Continue search for fast bowlers and aggressive batsmen;

• Coaches to continue working assiduously with players at all levels in the EWCOE in an effort to correct problems associated with no-balls, wides, poor shot selection, etc.;

• Studying of opponents by use of available technology made compulsory for all senior male and female players;

• CLOBI to be utilized as necessary in the training of players in the EWCOE, particularly with technique and “intelligence”;

• Organize workshops for match officials – scorers, match referees, curators and grounds-men;

• Continue domestic T20 semi-professional league;

• Continue domestic Super 50 semi-professional league;

• Commence domestic 3-Day semi-professional league.

4.5. Year 5 (2023 - 2024)

No new programmes are projected for Year 5. The schedule is as follows:

• Continue negotiations if necessary with relevant authorities for the provision of at least one teacher with cricket knowledge and interest to help manage and support a cricket programme in each primary school;

• Continue a Level 1 coaching education programme for primary school teachers;

• Add four new schools to the number of primary schools participating in the Kiddies Cricket programme;

• BCA in-house coaches to continue visits to primary schools to provide support for execution of the planned cricket programme in these schools;

• Continue negotiations if necessary for deployment of cricket masters/coaches to secondary schools;

• Assist secondary schools with procurement of equipment and covers for pitches;

• Organize cricket education workshops for primary and secondary schools coaches;

• Continue supply of cricket balls to clubs;

• Continue payment of fees for umpires officiating in the BCA’s domestic competitions;

• Continue payment of grants to clubs;

• Provide cash incentives for outstanding performances in Elite Division;

• Primary school coaches to continue assisting in the recruitment of girls to play cricket in the primary schools;

• Primary schools to ensure selection of at least one girl to play in the final eleven of each team participating in the Herman Griffith competition;

• Continue the secondary schools cricket programme for girls from First to Third Forms;

• Continue the secondary schools cricket programme for girls from Fourth to Sixth Forms;

• Intense training for female cricketers at the EWCOE to continue;

• Continue incentive payments for outstanding performances in the Iris Walker competitions;

• Continue search for fast bowlers and aggressive batsmen;

• Coaches to continue working assiduously with players at all levels in the EWCOE in an effort to correct problems associated with no-balls, wides, poor shot selection, etc.;

• Studying of opponents by use of available technology made compulsory for all senior male and female players;

• CLOBI to be utilized as necessary in the training of players in the EWCOE, particularly with technique and “intelligence”;

• Organize workshops for match officials – scorers, match referees, curators and grounds-men;

• Continue domestic T20 semi-professional league;

• Continue domestic Super 50 semi-professional league;

• Continue domestic 3-Day semi-professional league.

-end-

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